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I did something hard today. I was going to do something fun and challenging, but then I saw shiny things and suddenly an adventure was born. I hiked Mt. Juneau, which must not be that hard because multiple people ran by me, but it was definitely a challenge for me.

I was sweating like a hog in heat until I got to the top and started chatting with a raven. Once we ran out of things to talk about, I starting burping (6th grade best year ever). The raven was entertained, but the dude who came over the ridge after I had an especially good one was less so. 

Then the fog started rolling in and I got a little chilly until I noticed the next peak was glowing in sunlight. It was like a Lord of the Rings moment and I roused my inner elf to keep going. 

Wow. That's a long, hard hike. I know it wouldn't be that hard for others (still people ran by me), but eleven miles and 4,200 ft elevation gain felt hard to me. It took almost eight hours and I feel like I should have had some profound thoughts, but here's what happened in my brain:

1. I kept singing, I am woman hear my roar; I've got feet too big to ignore

2. When I worried about my body giving out, I affirmed each part. "Thank you toes for stabilizing me. Thank you bunions for just being you. Thank you ankles for your strength and flexibility. Thank you knees for getting me back up after I pee even though it was obvious that did not make you happy. . . " It's easy in mid-life to feel like my body betrays me so affirmations keep us together as a team.

3. Lamb curry

4. Is that the trail way over there? Why is it so far? Why did I see the basin an hour ago and I'm still descending? Why do marmots whistle? Why is that shiny? 

5. Remember how it smelled like blueberries on top? That made me happy.

Even without profundity, it was epic for me. I'm thankful for a strong body, a beautiful place to live, and ibuprofen.

 


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